“The Zen of Spec Script Versus Shooting Script”

A shooting script, written from the
spec script by a screenwriter with
the director, puts everything in the
screenplay that needs to be there
for shooting. Therefore, the lines
spoken in a foreign language are
written out in its native language
for the actors.

The first time a character in your
spec script speaks in a foreign
language, simply put under the
character’s name in parenthesis,
(Spanish). Then proceed to write
the dialogue in English throughout
the rest of the script.

Remember, a spec script is written
to get doors to open. So, the
screenwriter must make the screenplay
easy to read, fast to read, and cut-to-the-
chase so that the reader can move on to
the next script he or she has to read.
They don’t want to stumble upon some
foreign language. They’ll toss the script
in the slush pile.

Donald L. Vasicek
Writer/Filmmaker/Consultant
http://www.donvasicek.com
dvasicek@earthlink.net

“Market Ready Screenplays”

Writing screenplays and getting them
sold and produced are highly competitive.
One must write screenplays that are
market ready. To do anything less will
result in failure.

A market ready screenplay requires
dialogue, characterization, format, plot, subplot(s),
action, narrative, description, etc. that must
execute genres which people will go see at the
movie theater.

To write a market ready screenplay, the writer
must study screenplays that have been box
office hits. Once that is accomplished, the
screenwriter should then write their screenplay
that is fresh and unique, but yet, parallels
that of box office hits.

For example, a romantic comedy simply
requires the question, will the couple in
question, get together or not? The
twist here must be unique and fresh. “Must
Love Dogs” starring Diane Lane and John
Cusack exhibits the twist that Ms. Lane is
seeking a man through ads. The require-
ment, he must love dogs. Well, guess
what, Mr. Cusack doesn’t love dogs, but
she falls for him anyway, and on it goes.

Study the genre you’re interested in writing.
Study the format. The writing. Incorporate
a fresh and unique approach to your genre
of interest. This can be accomplished via
a new twist that has never before been
used in the genre of your choice.

Donald L. Vasicek
Writer/Filmmaker/Consultant
Olympus Films+, LLC
http://www.donvasicek.com
dvasicek@earthlink.net