“What is Your Concept of Love?”

by
Donald L. Vasicek
Writer/Filmmaker/Consultant
Olympus Films+, LLC
http://www.donvasicek.com
dvasicek@earthlink.net

"Unconditional Love is Universally Paramount."

“Unconditional Love is Universally Paramount.”


From where did all of that stuff about love come?
The newspaper? Television? All media?
The movies? A poem? A love story in
book form? A love story in short story form?
How your parents taught you about love, or
were you socialized or conditioned about
what love is? Your minister? Your priest?
Your friend? Perhaps the governor of your
state?

You get the point. Love comes from a host
of sources that make us what we are with
respect to love. Where love gets in the
way and causes pain, our emotional
intelligence also becomes involved.

Emotional intelligence? Yes, emotional
intelligence. Emotional intelligence
parallels emotional maturity. Emotional
maturity is how mature you act or
react when it comes to love. What
level of emotional intelligence/maturity
do you have?

Do you scream and holler at your loved one(s)
when you can’t have your way with them?
Do you stroke your lover’s face with the
tips of your finger? How is it that you learned
to make your life all about yourself when it
comes to wanting to possess the one you
love?

Are you capable of letting go? Can you give
up your workout so that you can watch the
kids because your husband is going to a
football game without thinking about yourself?

Can you take care of the kids when your wife
is going to a baby shower and your favorite
game is on television with love, and not
anger?

Can you look into your lover’s eyes and see
beyond the surface, see what is behind her/his
eyes, what’s going on in there?

How far will you go with love? What is love,
to you? Sex? A deep, passionate kiss.
A tap on the lips?

A love song? When you tell someone you
love them, what do you mean? What does
love mean to you? Think it’s authentic?

What is authentic love? Well, I’m jabbering
here. My point is, by going to the trouble
of learning all you can about love, you will
develop your concept of love. If you already
have a concept of love, you probably
wouldn’t be reading this. Whatever the case
may be, regardless of how long you have had
your concept of love, or you are seeking
your concept of love, you enhance your concept
of love by learning everything about yourself
and about love as you can. This approach to
love develops a concept of love that will
shelter and protect you if you lose the
one you love because you will know what
love is.

Donald L. Vasicek
Writer/Filmmaker?Consultant
Olympus Films+, LLC
http://www.donvasicek.com
dvasicek@earthlink.net

“The Log Line”

The log line must show what your movie is about. You have about a minimum of five or six words and a maximum of three, five to six word sentences to show it in the log line. The shorter, the better. If you are serious about writing, selling and getting your screenplays produced, then, you must think in terms of writing lean and mean. Lean and mean is the same thing, as the shorter, the better. This attitude will help you write to industry standards and help you hone your craft as a screenwriter.

A key here, is to use active verbs. Use them in your log lines, use them in your synopses, use them in your treatments and use them in your screenplays. The use of active verbs will help you streamline your writing. It will force you to write that show your descriptions and condense your dialogue. Think in terms of writing it with a beginning, a middle and an ending. Think of it the same way as movie trailers you see on television or in the theater. Think of writing the log line paralleling the same method that you read about them in television and movie guides.

Start your log line out with the main character. You should follow that with the description of the plot and end it with a hook that seduces people in wanting to read your screenplay.

An example that has been very successful for me with a screenplay I wrote, CATCHING THE FALL, is as follows: A common Joe races the clock to restore his son back to normal after the boy goes brain dead. Here, you can see who the main character is: A common Joe. The plot is: races (the key active verb) the clock to restore his son back to normal. And the ending hook is: after the boy goes brain dead. So, fix yourself up some potatoes and gravy and get to work on your log line.

Award-winning, writer/filmmaker, Donald L. Vasicek, dimensionalizes Olympus Films+, LLC’s services. He will bring you 35 years of writing and film making experience. Need to put your project together in a coherent fashion, but are stuck! Your storyline is rocky! What shots are you missing? Does your theme escape you, runs like an Olympic sprinter, away from you?  Whatever else needs repair so that you can move to the next level in your film, you will benefit by contacting Mr. Vasicek.

dvasicek@earthlink.net, http://www.donvasicek.com, 303-903-2103.
Rates/Fees affordable, negotiable and fair to fit your budget.
Contact him today so that you can move forward tomorrow!

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